Low sodium intake linked to heart problems?

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This is crazy. A new study evaluating the link between salt intake and heart problems finds that people with low sodium intake also have an increased risk of cardiovascular issues. But the “low” sodium intake that was linked to increased risk was between 2,000 and 3,000mg per day…in other words, substantially higher than the American Heart Association’s recommended maximum intake of 1500mg. The risk declined slightly at higher intakes and then rose again when sodium intake got up around 8,000mg per day.

Study details: Too little salt may also increase risk of heart problems.

To me, this somewhat ridiculous finding confirms what I’ve long suspected:Except for those with salt-sensitive hypertension, the relationship between sodium intake and heart disease is largely a red herring. I think we could do a lot more good by coaching people to increase their potassium intake than haranguing them to decrease sodium intake.

Related Content:

Sodium and Potassium: What’s the Relationship?
Forget Salt: Focus on Potassiu
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Why Can’t The Experts Agree on Sodium?

About Monica Reinagel

A licensed nutritionist, noted author, and trained chef, Monica Reinagel, MS, LN, CNS, is creator of the #1-ranked Nutrition Diva podcast (http://nutritiondiva.quickanddirtytips.com/), author of the Nutrition Over Easy blog (http://nutritionovereasy.com/), and is a frequent contributor to leading health and lifestyle websites and magazines.
Monica's books include Amazon best-seller The Inflammation Free Diet Plan, as well as The Life Extension Revolution: The New Science of Growing Older without Aging (with Philip Miller, M.D.) and The Secrets of Evening Primrose Oil. Her latest book is Secrets for a Healthy Diet: What to Eat, What to Avoid, and What to Stop Worrying About (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0312676417).
Monica holds a Master's Degree in Human Nutrition and is a board-certified nutrition specialist. She's the creator of the IF Rating system, a scientific method of predicting the inflammatory or anti-inflammatory effects of foods. Professional affiliations include the American Dietetic Association, the American College of Nutrition, the Association of Health Care Journalists, and the International Association of Culinary Professionals. She makes her home in Baltimore, MD. Connect with Monica on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/NutritionDiva).

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